Medical Planning for Two

Ray’s Take: Planning how you’ll handle health expenses is one of the crucial jobs for any couple when planning for retirement. While many elements of health insurance are based on the individual, it’s important to evaluate these expenses as a couple because what happens to one person inevitably affects the couple as a whole. From a financial point of view and also from a caregiver point of view.

Trying to figure the impact can be difficult. The range of what health care costs could be in retirement can run from nominal to explosive. You can plan for “average,” but you have to look at best case and worst case as well. Remember that retirement is like a cross-country car trip with no gas stations. What’s in the tank at the beginning is likely to be all there is!

Take a realistic look at your health and your spouse’s health. Know the family history of health issues like heart disease and Alzheimer’s. It’s important to take these factors into consideration when planning for retirement. And to make contingency plans to cover the possibilities. Will your spouse be your main caregiver and vice versa? Or do you have another preference?

People tend to assume Medicare will cover health expenses in retirement, but this simply isn’t true. Medicare covered 62 percent of an individual’s medical expenses in 2013, according to a 2017 report from the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI). That’s on average. Even with Medicare, retirees are going to pay more for health care than many are accustomed to under their current employer-sponsored health plans.

You may not be able to reduce your risk of some diseases, but you cantake care of your health, which will keep your costs down. Retirement is a complex and expensive phase of life, and all aspects should be calculated as carefully as possible prior to taking the plunge. It’s usually not inflation or even market performance that presents the biggest risk to your retirement plan. It’s unexpected medical expenses.

Dana’s Take: Dreaming about retirement with your significant other can be a thoroughly enjoyable experience. Planning for that retirement, however, can be less pleasant. One spouse may take the role of optimist, assuming today’s health and wealth will continue forever. This can place the other spouse in the role of pessimist if he or she wants to plan for assisted living and significant health care expenses.

A couple of good tips for these conversations. Be ready to compromise and be respectful of each other’s views. Nobody wants to feel like they’re being railroaded into something.

Meeting with a financial professional can take some of the pressure off.

Having a third party who sees things from outside can help a couple to bring their differing ideas into a cohesive plan that works for both.

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