Playing It Safe

Ray’s Take: With the rise in major hacking instances, it’s more important than ever to be safe, savvy and vigilant when it comes to online accounts. Not only were there major hacks to some of the big-box stores like Target and Home Depot, but they also happened at sites that are perceived to be much more secure. Like Experian – and the federal government. Remember the hack into the personnel database?

What’s the average person to do in the face of all this hacking? A few preventive measures you can take would be these.

Start with a fraud alert. Very effective and not as cumbersome as a credit freeze. Check your bank and credit card transactions online regularly – no less than once a week. Banks and credit card companies are much more vigilant and effective at spotting suspicious activity and reaching out to you, but no one knows your business better than you.

Try not to sign up for every website and web service that asks you to. This spreads your information so far across the web that you’ll never remember where you have accounts. Keep an eye on your email and junk folder. If a website you’ve forgotten about sends you an email, let it be a flag to go there and delete your information and close the account. I’d like to say read what you’re accepting when you sign up for things, but that’s hardly realistic.

Minimize the information you share on any website. If your phone number and address are required to create the account, go back after you’ve signed up to see if you can change or remove information. Try editing the phone number to 1234, or street address to Property SearchCrime ReportNeighborhood ReportWatch Service" style="color: #7d0200; text-decoration-line: underline;">100 Main St. for sites that don’t truly need that information.

Be as careful, and as vigilant, as you can. Keep an eagle eye on all of your accounts. But the harsh cold facts of the new world are that true privacy does not currently exist.

Dana’s Take: When it comes to privacy on the internet, the younger generation seems to be unfamiliar with the concept. Every aspect of their lives is splashed across social media like the latest movie trailer or hot book.

Keeping privacy settings up to date can seem like a full-time job – and sometimes a nightmare. How public are your posts on social media? Have you ever thought about Facebook “about” information like high school and colleges attended? We could be supplying a scammer with a script to say he or she attended the same class. I suppose one has to think like a criminal to set security settings. Or opt out.

Think about how much information you’ve made public already before sharing access to your life and family.

Bridging the Gap
Medical Planning for Two